Bystander
Motor yacht
JFA | 42 m | 2008
Sejaa
Sailing yacht
JFA | 25.13 m | 2002
Mashua Bluu
Sailing yacht
JFA | 30 m | 2011
Zeepaard
Motor yacht
JFA | 37 m | 2003
Azizam
Sailing yacht
JFA | 26 m | 2004
Axantha II
Motor yacht
JFA | 43 m | 2011
Windquest
Sailing yacht
JFA | 26.25 m | 2014
Arcana
Motor yacht
€ 18,500,000
JFA | 38.28 m | 2017

Latest News

Video : 88.5-metre superyacht Illusion Plus under construction
Chinese yard Pride Mega Yachts has announced a construction video of its superyacht Illusion Plus, which should be completed and launched this year. The project was announced in 2007, but was put on hold because of world economical crisis.British studio Rainsford Saunders Design is responsible for exterior, inspired by Rolls-Royce cars, while Dutch designers Sinot Exclusive Yacht Design.The yacht is built from a steel hull and aluminium superstructure to ABS class, will accommodate 12 guests and 25 crew members, in master suite, 2 VIPs, 2 doubles and 2 twins, with interior volume of 3,600GT.Powered by twin 3,000hp Rolls-Royce diesel-electric engines, with a top speed of 16 knots and cruising speed at 14 knots with 5,000nm range.
50-metre Heesen yacht VanTom delivered
Heesen has announced the delivery of VanTom, the sixth yacht in the popular 50 metre semi-displacement class designed by Frank Laupman at Omega Architects. The delivery took place in international waters on February 14, 2018 after intensive tests in the rough winter waves of the North Sea. The sea trials took place on January 12 and 29 in Beaufort 4 and 6, with North westerly winds and waves up to one metre. Captain David Burge comments: “During sea trials, the yacht handled extremely well and gave a very smooth ride, even whilst proceeding at a speed of over 20 knots with a sea running. I am most excited about our maiden voyage down to the Mediterranean Sea and very much look forward to the 2018 summer cruising season.”VanTom exceeded the contractual speed by 0.3 knots, reaching a top speed of 20.3 knots, while at 11 knots she has a transatlantic range of 3,100 nautical miles. With a Gross Tonnage of below the 500GT threshold, VanTom sports a highly efficient hard-chine hull and propulsion system that is both quiet and vibration-free, even at higher speeds. Arne Ploch at Camper & Nicholsons, who represented the client’s commercial interests during the construction, comments: “It was a real pleasure to work with Heesen throughout this new build for the past two years. It’s been a smooth relationship based on mutual trust and respect, the way it should be when building a new yacht. It has been a great experience for the owner and his team.”The Heesen 5000 Aluminium class has proven to be a revolutionary offering. Hinging on a semi-custom platform, the pioneering concept enables clients to have a yacht they can customise that relies on proven design and technology, reducing both client costs and construction times.
Yogi: Inside the largest yacht that ever sank
Few events have ever affected yachting as much as the sinking of the 60 meter Yogi. The largest yacht to ever sink, its wreck strongly hit the Turkish shipbuilding sector and made owners take a hard look at their insurances and dangers, even though no one was hurt. Despite the accident, Yogi was no less of an exceptional yacht.Yogi was the largest yacht ever built by up and coming Turkish shipyard, Proteksan Turquoise at the time of her delivery in 2011. Reminiscent of an explorer style yacht through her design by Jean Guy Verges, Yogi featured oversized portholes in her hull that brought in tons of flight into the yacht's cabins.Built for Stephane Courbit, a French media and TV millionaire valued at €450 million, Yogi was built to be operated as a charter yacht part of its hotel collection. Maximizing space, the yacht had many amenities for her size including a swimming pool, beach club, wellness center and media room. Yet, on February 17th 2012, just as the yacht was days out of leaving the yard where it was undergoing warrantied maintenance work, it sank in the Aegean sea. The weather was particularly difficult during that day and yet it seems to be an engine failure that, tied to a number of circumstantial events, led to the 60-meter yacht sinking to the bottom of the Mediterranean. The report did, however, clear Proteksan in the quality of its build, focusing on what was a mixture of human oversight and extreme conditions. A Turkish investigations arrived at similar conclusions. Manned by a skeleton crew of 8 during this voyage, it took an hour to evacuate by helicopter the yacht's crew as seas at their peek featured waves of up to 7 meters.The largest yacht to have ever cruised with the French flag, Yogi was part of Courbit's Lov Collection, a holding company that includes the Les Airelles palace in Courchevel as well as the Pan Dei hotel in St Tropez. Built with charter in mind to its existing and new clientele, the yacht commanded prices of up to €378,000 per week and featured 800 square meter of interior space in a particularly luxurious interior.A key element in Yogi's design was her large pool with overflow that sat aft of the yacht's main deck, directly on top of its beach club. In the middle of the pool was a glass porthole that flooded the area underneath with light. All around the pool were lounging pads for Yogi's guest to take in the sun when the yacht was anchored off in a bay.To complement the swimming pool aft of the main deck, a Jacuzzi was also placed aft of the sundeck, for guests that wanted to enjoy the sun in a hot tub. Also surrounded by sunpads, these feature a common beige design throughout the yacht with colored pillows. Same can be said for the customizable lounging area aft of the upper deck.On the inside, Yogi was reminiscent of Courbit's luxurious hotels. Featuring a beige and creme tone throughout the yacht, the 60-meter was fitted with floor to ceiling windows that visually increased the size of its 800 square meters of interior space. Its main salon was structured into a lounging area and a TV sector with a wide screen built into the wall.Stretching across the full beam of the yacht, Yogi's master bedroom was no less spectacular with both lots of light and space. A king sized bed throned in the middle of the suite with access through a central corridor to a dressing room and his and hers bathrooms. The yacht's guest accommodation didn't also pale in comparison with the owner's stateroom. Finished in the same style, the double and twin guest cabins could be connected or separated through double sliding doors. In total, Yogi could accommodate a total of 12 guests across 6 cabins.Tall windows could be found throughout the yacht and were a real differentiating factor from competition on the market for Yogi. 'The idea was to have a yacht that could be chartered and run just like a resort.' detailed its designer, Jean Guy Verges in a later interview. 'She has been designed to the specific request of her owner. I think this jewel offered more than you would expect of a yacht her size.'Another interesting amenity of Yogi was her observational lounge up on the sun deck. Finished throughout in glass, the area boasted a 180 degree view into the yacht's surroundings through a climate controlled environment. Equipped with custom furniture from the likes of Hermes, this media lounge separated the sun deck into a Jacuzzi and a raised dinning area.Down on the upper deck, which also featured a covered dinning room, guests would find an extensive lounging pad with tiles that could be raised or flattened to create lounging chairs or sun beds. Connected to iPods and iPhones, which in 2011 was still rare, Yogi featured an advanced system for her time with TVs that slid out even in front of lounging pads.Viewed by many as a step forward for the Turkish yacht building sector and as an endorsement of their quality, when Yogi sank, the whole country took a hit. By 2011, yacht owners and charters had started outgrowing the stigma of building in Turkey and the market was picking up for local builders. In fact Yogi was the largest yacht ever built by Proteksan.Yogi's delivery was followed weeks after by their newest flagship, a 70.5-meter reminiscent of a Dutch-build quality, Talisman C. Shortly after it followed the 72-meter Vicky and it looked like Turkey would emerge as a yacht building destination. This all ended when Yogi sank in February 2012 and owners' stigma towards Turkey developed once again.Although some Turkish shipyards continued to prosper, many faded down their ambitions in a global recession. This ultimately culminated with the acquisition of Proteksan Turquoise by Dutch-based Oceanco. Backed by billionaire investor Mohammed Al Barwani, the Dutch superyacht builder since set out on a mission to make the yard competitive and got an order for a 77-meter yacht now under build.Having initially started his career in television in the 1990s, Stephane Courbit where he built a reputation, eventually starting his own production company behind hits such as Miss France. Eventually acquired by Dutch holding Endemol, Courbit exited from the company in 2001. His LOV Group currently includes companies in the audiovisual space with several production companies behind some of France's most popular game shows. Other investments include several betting sites, which he started in acquiring in 2007. One of his fastest growing divisions has now becomes the Airelles collection of hotels.After investing nearly $200 million into the purchase and renovation of the five star Courchevel palace, Les Airelles, Courbit acquired the Pan Dei Palace in St Tropez. His hotel portfolio then grew with the Bastide de Gordes in 2014. Two more Airelles hotels are set to open in the next two years, one in Versailles and one in Val d'Isiere.
Inside the first superyacht to have an indoor tennis court
Innovation in the superyacht space can sometimes seem barely incremental, until a ship is launched that changes the game. Barely cracking the first half of the world's 100 largest yachts, Aviva became the first yacht to have an indoor padel tennis court. Built for a UK billionaire, the 98-meter is also the largest yacht ever built by Abeking & Rasmussen.Launched in January 2017, Aviva was designed by British design studio, Reymond Langton, morphing into their largest creation to date. Boasting large interior volumes throughout its hull, Aviva also manages to feature some exterior space to take in the sun. Its sheer scale required Abeking & Rasmussen to create a special system to launch the yacht with a special pontoon.Delivered within 33 months of signing the contract, Aviva was commissioned by UK billionaire Joe Lewis, currently valued by Forbes at $5 billion. His fourth superyacht named Aviva, Lewis' former yacht was a 68-meter version of his current flagship also built by Abeking & Rasmussen. Extensively used as a floating home and office by the investment mogul, Aviva's volume would be impressive for any yacht.The powerful looking hull is the result of new research and testing which ensures superior seakeeping abilities combined with a 20% decrease in drag. Less engine output is required, fuel consumption is reduced and the maximum speed is a full 20 knots. A very special feature is the hybrid drive system: it allows Aviva to run at up to 11 knots without the use of the main engines, using electric motors only.Aviva's main feature, however, became an indoor, full-sized padel tennis court. Stretching across a length of 20 meters and a width of 10 meters, the court area goes up 6.65 meters high, a space that would be difficult to fit into any type of yacht. Aviva's 5,000GT of interior volume, however, allowed to blend in this space without compromises as to the size of the court."It is not only a lifestyle change for the owner but also for the crew as this is also the largest gym of any yacht." the yacht's designers' commented. "The crew is encouraged to play with the owner and guests and when the court is not in use for padel, the net can be removed and the crew plays football and use other exercise equipment in the space. It is after all a sports hall."Perfectly lit through lights on the ceiling, this indoor court sits amidst the yacht's hull and stretches down to the bottom of its draft. In addition to the padel tennis court is a small lounging and viewing area up a series of stairs. Hidden away behind a net to protect the ball from flying away, the viewing area can also be used for gym equipment whilst a game is being played. "The owner is adamant that this is the best padel tennis court in the world, period!" the studio continued.In terms of exterior relaxation areas, Aviva features a circular set of lounging pads up on her sun deck as well as small, hidden away lounging pads towards the yacht's bridge. Powered by an eco-friendly system, the 98-meter can reach a top speed of 20 knots and cruise at 11 knots by using only electric power. This is achieved, in part, thanks to her innovative hull design couple with an electric propulsion system.Apart from her sundeck, most of the areas on the 98-meter superyacht are found inside, which gives it tremendous volume required for a live onboard owner. An exterior lounging area can, however, still be found aft of the main, upper and third decks with a series of lounging chairs and sun pads. A swimming platform also opens up onto the sea, creating a beach club area, her tenders being launched through side doors."Featuring a fresh and dynamic contemporary exterior design, unique, highly personalized layout for the interior and a cutting edge technical platform, Aviva is intended as a home away from home, and as a result the layout moves away from current trends to maximise the spaces that will be used the most, and create a welcome, inviting atmosphere, with a combination of spacious, open social lounges alongside more intimate and discreet areas for dining, working and relaxation." commented Andrew Langton "The interior design features a number of avant-garde architectural elements and details, and uses a rich combination of fabric and leathers in light, warm tones."Throughout the yacht, Aviva features a modern design with sleek shapes couple with an extensive use of glass and stainless steel. Opting for a clear colour scheme with sprinkles of vivd soft furnishings, Aviva's exterior and interior look follows that of Lewis' former 68m Aviva."Communication and information are critical to me." Lewis said in an interview with regards to his requirements for his floating office. "To be effective, I need reliable phones and internet, these have improved much over the past few years, but, it is too expensive, too slow and not consistently reliable. Aviva is more than an office; it is also my home for much of the year. So for me, it is relaxing working from home, wherever Aviva may be in the world."Currently valued at $5 billion by Forbes, Joe Lewis sits as the 5th richest man in the United Kingdom. Chairman of the Tavistock Group with investments in over 200 companies, the 81 year-old started his career in the catering business in London, joining his father's company at the age of 15 in 1958. Initially making his wealth by selling that business in 1979, Lewis moved into currency trading, switching his residence to the Bahamas. Teaming up with George Soros in 1992, the pair bet against the pound and earned exponential returns with Lewis reportedly pocketing even more than Soros.Lewis' portfolio now includes Premier League club, Tottenham Hotspur as well as Lake Nona, a fast growing development in Orlando, Florida. In December 2016, he paid $165 million to acquire the Hyatt Regency Pier Sixty-Six hotel in Fort Lauderdale through Tavistock. In addition to this, Lewis owns stakes in UK's largest pub operator, Mitchell's and Butlers as well as luxury club resort Albany.In a deal profiled by the Guardian, Lewis was able to back a Christie's art auction for the Ganz collection, guaranteeing a minimum sales price of $168 million and, eventually, splitting the $38 million net profit with the auction house when the sale fetched $206 million weeks later. "Being a trader means that you are wrong at the very least three times out of 10, and that is very hard." Lewis once told Fortune magazine.Prior to taking deliver of the 98-meter flagship, Lewis' largest yacht was the 68-meter Aviva delivered by Abeking & Rasmussen in 2007. A smaller version of his current yacht, the 68-meter featured a similar focus towards interior volume and acted as Lewis' floating office with a Bloomberg terminal and several trading screens onboard.In 1998, Lewis had taken delivery of 62-meter Feadship, Lady Aviva, which later caught fire in the Red Sea. The yacht was eventually salvaged by serial yacht owner, Dennis Washington, who transformed the yacht into Attessa III. Lewis' second Aviva became the 60-meter Oceanco built in 2004 as Alfa Four and now known as Sea Pearl.
Money Makers: 5 yachts that generated the most revenue in 2017
Despite the brokerage market going through slow times ever since the past financial crisis, the superyacht charter market has grown in strength with some of the largest yachts being the most demanded. Through its Timeline platform and market research, Yacht Harbour compiled a ranking of the charter yachts having generated the most revenue during the summer 2017 according to our findings. Estimates may include some revenue from owners chartering their own yachts as these are registered as commercial. #1 Romea Length: 81.8 metersPrice per week: €875.000Estimated revenue: €12-12.5 millionDelivered in 2015 by German shipyard, Abeking & Rasmussen, Romea was designed by Terence Disdale. Her interior layout features a full-beam master suite, catered by a crew of 23. Amongst its highlights are two limousine tenders, a Jacuzzi on the sun deck, a dedicated spa area and a cinema room. With a cruising speed of 14 knots she has a range of 6,000 nm.#2 SavannahLength: 83.5 metersPrice per week: €1.000.000 Estimated revenue: €10-10.5 millionOne of the first examples of a hybrid superyacht, Savannah is powered by extremely quiet electric-diesel engines. Another one of the innovations onboard is the underwater observation room letting charter guests see both over and under the sea. More traditional amenities also include a large swimming pool aft of the main deck, an extensive master suite forward of the upper deck with panoramic windows and a private deck as well as a gym with a sea view, a spa and a hammam. #3 Here Comes The SunLength: 83 meters Price per week: €1.300.000Estimated revenue: €9-9.5 millionDelivered as part of Amels' limited edition series last year, Here Comes The Sun became the shipyard's largest yacht to date and her owner's 4th yacht named after a Beattles' song.Amongst her main features are a swimming pool aft of the main deck, an extensive beach club area located right under neath with a sitting area, sauna and gym. Other amenities also include a cinema room and a large Jacuzzi on the sundeck.#4 MogamboLength: 74 metersPrice per week: €650.000Estimated revenue: €8.5-9.7 millionNamed after a movie starring Clark Gable and Grace Kelly, Mogambo was built by Nobiskrug in 2012. Reymond Langton’s exterior and interior design result in well-balanced lines and simple details, thus, making her a good option for cruising with family and friends. She is replete with amenities that include a cinema room, beauty salon, massage and steam rooms, as well as an array of water toys. As she underwent refitting in 2016, her sundeck Jacuzzi was significantly enlarged and her gym redesigned. Mogambo is capable of accommodating 12 guests and is looked after by 17 crew. #5 KismetLength: 95.2 metersPrice per week: € 1.200.000Estimated revenue: €7.5-8.4 millionDelivered by Germany-based Lurssen in 2014 to American billionaire Shahid Khan as a replacement for his previous 68-meter Kismet, the 95.2-meter yacht boasts a jaguar on the bow of the yacht, symbolic of the owner's NFL team, the Jacksonville Jaguars, which he bought in November 2011 for $760 million according to the New York Times.Built with corporate entertainment and charter in mind, Kismet stretches over five decks suitable for parties of up to 270 guests. Amongst innovative features on Kismet are her video walls, extending up to two decks high, able to show regular television but programmed to display high-definition moving artwork.